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Why a show about salt?

Post by Pamela Grombacher

Salt is everywhere - in our foods, on our roads, in thousands of the chemicals and consumer products we use every day. Despite this, salt is not something we notice very often. When not maligned as unhealthy, salt is typically overlooked. It is so pervasive in our daily lives that it is essentially invisible, something we take for granted without much thought. In this sense, salt is unremarkable.

But its everyday-ness makes salt the perfect case study for the Rethinking MATTER project as we continue to explore the “material turn” in contemporary visual art. Simply put, the material turn represents a shift in focus from the conceptual to the physical, from words to things. This discourse (which spans a range of disciplines) often positions materials as enmeshed in sociopolitical histories and power structures. The ways in which we use objects can uphold (or disrupt) the status quo and reinforce (or trouble) our positions within that status quo. In this way, materials create us as much as we create them. But despite their power and consequence, everyday materials are easy to overlook. By exhibiting artists who either work with unusual materials or use traditional materials in unorthodox ways, we hope to not only explore the formal and aesthetic potential of such artistic experimentation, but to also bring the sociopolitical contexts in which matter operates into sharper focus.
 

 Sigalit Landau,  Salt Bride

Sigalit Landau, Salt Bride

There is a growing number of artists who have taken up salt as their medium of choice. In our research for this exhibition, we spoke with Sigalit Landau (IL), who submerges everyday objects into the Dead Sea to encrust them in salt, and Ruth E. Lyons (IE), who carves sculptures from the rock of salt mines that trace the ancient Zechstein Sea from Ireland to Russia.

 Ruth E. Lyons,  Salarium 230 Million BCE - 2030 CE

Ruth E. Lyons, Salarium 230 Million BCE - 2030 CE

We discovered Motoi Yamamoto’s (JP) sprawling labyrinths and Hannah Quinlivan’s (AU) otherworldly installations. Considered together, these works hint at salt’s complexity as a material that is steeped in history, linked with place, and loaded with meaning.

 Motoi Yamamoto,  Labyrinth

Motoi Yamamoto, Labyrinth

 Hannah Quinlivan,  State of Suspension

Hannah Quinlivan, State of Suspension

Mark Kurlansky illustrates this complexity in his book, Salt: A World History. Tracing salt’s shifting and diverse roles across cultures over the past 5,000 years, he makes a compelling case that salt has, in many ways, defined civilization. It’s former status as the dominant means of food preservation (and the resulting global trade and related taxation), for example, positioned salt as a force that has driven economies, shaped landscapes, catalyzed wars and inspired political uprisings such as the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt was powerful. 

Salt’s rich history became clear to us as we planned this exhibition. But we were originally inspired by the work of two artists who use salt in ways that reveal its aesthetic potential. For Rethinking MATTER | Salt, we invited these artists - Nika Blasser (US) and Nat Bloch Gregersen (DK) - to create new salt-based works specifically for PLADS artspace.

Nika Blasser uses hyper-saline water to create what she calls “salt-scapes.” Salt water leaves behind a granular residue as it dries, which allows the artist to build fields of salt crystals on the work surface, layer by layer.

 Nika Blasser, photo documentation of salt growing process

Nika Blasser, photo documentation of salt growing process

Blasser traveled to Aarhus for a three-week production residency in advance of the exhibition’s opening on January 5, 2018. While here, she experimented with new techniques and materials to adapt to Aarhus’ humid climate, which creates different conditions for the salt’s crystallization than her native Oregon. Perhaps influenced by the darkness of Nordic winter, Blasser created a series of 21 works on paper whose murky tones suggest geological forms.

 Nika Blasser,  Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord

Nika Blasser, Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord

 Nika Blasser,  Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord  (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær

Nika Blasser, Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær

 Nika Blasser,  Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord  (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

Nika Blasser, Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

 Nika Blasser,  Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord  (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

Nika Blasser, Salt Land, Salt Sea: Drømme fra vor Jord (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

Nat Bloch Gregersen’s Iris is the latest in a series of installations featuring sculptural mounds of rock salt that trace the artist’s movements as she dropped the salt onto the gallery floor. Bloch Gregersen highlights the rough, gritty texture of this specific salt, which is typically used to de-ice winter roads, with coloured pigment, and mirrors this colour play with tinted window foil and rubber sculptures that filter the natural light and situate her sculptures within the specific architecture of the exhibition space.

 Nat Bloch Gregersen,  Iris . Photo by Shu Yi.

Nat Bloch Gregersen, Iris. Photo by Shu Yi.

 Nat Bloch Gregersen,  Iris  (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

Nat Bloch Gregersen, Iris (detail). Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

 Nat Bloch Gregersen,  Iris  (detail). Photo by Shu Yi.

Nat Bloch Gregersen, Iris (detail). Photo by Shu Yi.

 Nat Bloch Gregersen,  Iris  (detail). Photo by Shu Yi.

Nat Bloch Gregersen, Iris (detail). Photo by Shu Yi.

By shining a spotlight on salt, we hope to have revealed it as remarkable - beautiful, responsive to artistic experimentation, and evocative of something bigger than itself.

  Rethinking MATTER  |  Salt . Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

Rethinking MATTER | Salt. Photo by Minik Busk Langkjær.

looking back...

After a lovely summer we are slowly starting to plan future exhibitions - and what better way than to start than by looking back on the first three installments of the Rethinking MATTER series.

We couldn't be happier or more proud to have shown three very different exhibitions with loads of beautiful works by a range of excellent artists - all revolving around, examining and rethinking artistic matter and materiality.  

Here are some of our favorite pictures from our first three shows, installations and openings...

 Mariko Wada,  State of Mind , stoneware, plate technique, 2014. 

Mariko Wada, State of Mind, stoneware, plate technique, 2014. 

Rethinking MATTER: The Tactile opened January 6, 2017.

For this show we invited six artists who work with their respective media in distinctly tactile ways that invoke the senses and invite an embodied viewing experience characterized by movement.

A big thanks to all the artists featured in The Tactile: Line Busch, Alysha Creighton, Hanne G, Rieko Hotta, Christian Saucedo & Mariko Wada

 Line Busch:  Untitled,  oil on canvas, 2016

Line Busch: Untitled, oil on canvas, 2016

 Lise Skytte Jakobsen and Hanne G., 2017

Lise Skytte Jakobsen and Hanne G., 2017

In connection with this exhibition, we hosted an artist talk about materiality within the intersection of art and craft.

Hanne G. in conversation with Lise Skytte Jakobsen.

The event was made in collaboration with MOBIL.

 Christian Saucedo:  Klodeskyer , Installation, wood and paper, 2016

Christian Saucedo: Klodeskyer, Installation, wood and paper, 2016

 Opening night,  Rethinking MATTER:   The Tactile , January 6, 2017

Opening night, Rethinking MATTER: The Tactile, January 6, 2017


 Installation view, Søren Krag:  Spring and Bucket , digital print on neopren mat, 2017;  Merging Patterns , digital image and picture frames, 2017;  Suspended Stick , print on canvas, 2017.

Installation view, Søren Krag: Spring and Bucket, digital print on neopren mat, 2017; Merging Patterns, digital image and picture frames, 2017; Suspended Stick, print on canvas, 2017.

The second exhibition, Digital Materiality, explored the physicality of the digital realm.

This show featured four young, Danish artists, all of whom work with the digital from a uniquely material perspective.

A big thank you to all the artists: Emilie Carlsen, Søren Krag, Anne-Sofie Overgaard & Anders Visti.

Digital Materiality opened May 3, 2017.

 Installation view,  Rethinking MATTER: Digital Materiality.  LEFT: Anne-Sofie Overgaard,  Untitled , digital weaving, 2016. RIGHT: Emilie Carlsen,  Digital Realism Green,  digital and analog printing on silk satin, 2015;  Digital Realism - Pink,  digital and analog print on viscose silk, 2015.

Installation view, Rethinking MATTER: Digital Materiality. LEFT: Anne-Sofie Overgaard, Untitled, digital weaving, 2016. RIGHT: Emilie Carlsen, Digital Realism Green, digital and analog printing on silk satin, 2015; Digital Realism - Pink, digital and analog print on viscose silk, 2015.

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In connection with this exhibition, we hosted an intimate round-table discussion about the digital >< the material, focusing on the relation between digital and material processes in art-making.

 

Photo by Kirstine Schiess Højmose.

 Installation view: Emilie Carlsen,  The Silent Witness, &nbsp;print on paper, 2016.

Installation view: Emilie Carlsen, The Silent Witness, print on paper, 2016.


This year's third and final show opened during Art Weekend Aarhus on May 19, 2017. Rethinking MATTER: Biotic Synthetic was a group exhibition featuring work by eight artists (three of whom participated as an artist group). This show focused on the interplay between organic and synthetic materials, filling the space with insects, dirt, plastic, spaghetti, soap and other unorthodox materials.

A big thank you to all the artists from Biotic Synthetic: Carolien Adriaansche, Louise Haugaard Jørgensen, Regitze Engelsborg Karlsen, Villiam Miklos, Julie Stavad & MOTOR / Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Malte Klagenberg & Margrét Agnes Iversen.  

 MOTOR,  Night Shortly , terrarium with cockroaches, cast of romanescoe cabbage, sand and print, 2017.

MOTOR, Night Shortly, terrarium with cockroaches, cast of romanescoe cabbage, sand and print, 2017.

 Louise Haugaard Jørgensen,&nbsp; Tonight's Menu , performance during the opening of Rethinking MATTER:&nbsp; Bitotic Synthetic , May 19,&nbsp;2017.

Louise Haugaard Jørgensen, Tonight's Menu, performance during the opening of Rethinking MATTER: Bitotic Synthetic, May 19, 2017.

During the opening reception, Louise Haugaard Jørgensen performed her work, Tonight's Menu, which was then presented as a video throughout the remainder of the exhibition.

 Installation view,  Rethinking MATTER: Biotic Synthetic.&nbsp; LEFT: Julie Stavad,&nbsp; Collages , 2017;&nbsp;  Misbehaving soap ,&nbsp;soap, 2015;  Half a word, &nbsp;soap, 2015. RIGHT:&nbsp;Regitze Engelsborg Kalrsen (featured):  Untitled , soil and gravel from the harbor in Aarhus, 2017.

Installation view, Rethinking MATTER: Biotic Synthetic. LEFT: Julie Stavad, Collages, 2017;  Misbehaving soap, soap, 2015; Half a word, soap, 2015. RIGHT: Regitze Engelsborg Kalrsen (featured): Untitled, soil and gravel from the harbor in Aarhus, 2017.

 Workshop with Carolien Adriaansche, May 2017

Workshop with Carolien Adriaansche, May 2017

In the weeks before the opening of Biotic Synthetic, the Dutch artist Carolien Adriaansche had a short-term residency in Aarhus to develop a new, site-specific work for the show. During her stay, she scavanged the city looking for plastic waste to use as artistic material. 

Her stay resulted in the monumental work Aarhus Collection 2017, an installation of plastic man-made creatures inspired by modes of display found at natural history museums.

 Carolien Adriaansche:  Collection Aarhus 2017,  plastic, cardboard, fish-line, 2017.

Carolien Adriaansche: Collection Aarhus 2017, plastic, cardboard, fish-line, 2017.

 Villiam Miklos:  Installation with plaster cube, mold painting, three concrete reliefs, a photography and a bundle of uncooked spaghetti ,&nbsp;2017 (detail).

Villiam Miklos: Installation with plaster cube, mold painting, three concrete reliefs, a photography and a bundle of uncooked spaghetti, 2017 (detail).


And just for fun, here are some behind-the-scenes installation photos:

 Sasha and Pam building a plinth in the office.&nbsp;

Sasha and Pam building a plinth in the office. 

 Pam and Nana up on the lift, installing work by Villiam Miklos.

Pam and Nana up on the lift, installing work by Villiam Miklos.

All in all - we would like to thank everyone involved in the first three installments of the Rethinking MATTER exhibition series - all of the artists, the technical crew at Godsbanen (special thanks to Erik Jørgensen), and of course our supporters: Aarhus Center for Visual Arts, Godsbanen, the Municipality of Aarhus and The Danish Art Foundation.

Stay tuned here and on our Facebook page for upcoming projects - more info will follow this fall!

Rethinking MATTER_logo.jpg

Kunstige havdyr og levende insekter i kunstige miljøer

Om udstillingen "Biotic Synthetic" i Godsbanens foyer, Aarhus.
Af: Sasha Rose Richter

I udstillingsrækken Rethinking MATTER har vi gennemgående haft fokus på gentænkning af materialer i kunsten. I nærværende udstilling 'Biotic Synthetic' undersøges brugen af naturlige og syntetiske materialer, og ikke mindst hvordan beskueren reagerer i mødet med disse, i kunstens verden, utraditionelle materialer.

Det mest iøjnefaldende syntestiske materiale i udstillingen er plastik, der går igen i flere af værkerne. Når man taler om plastik i vores samtid, er det svært ikke også at lede tankerne hen på vores antropocæne tidsalder og det plastikaftryk vor tid uundgåeligt vil sætte på jorden. Værket af Carolien Adriaansche kredser netop om dette emne. Hun har under et ophold i Aarhus lavet en stedspecifik installation af genbrugsplastik fundet på gader og stræder i Aarhus og særligt på de mange byggepladser, der findes rundt om i byen. Derudover har hun fundet plastik hos Reuse og lokale beboere har doneret deres eget plastikaffald.

 Carolien Adriaanche, " Collection Aarhus C ", 2017. Genbrugsplast fundet i og omkring Aarhus.&nbsp;&nbsp;

Carolien Adriaanche, "Collection Aarhus C", 2017. Genbrugsplast fundet i og omkring Aarhus.  

Den indsamlede plastik har Adriaansche på fantasifuld vis forvandlet til en ny biodiversitet af væsener, inspireret af havdyr. Men samtidigt med at værket er både legende og nøjsommeligt farvekoordineret, leder det også tankerne hen på den plastiksuppe vores plastaffald efterlader i verdenshavene. Man kan nærmest forestille sig at Adriaansches væsner, er havdyr der gennem lang tids indtag af plastikstykker, selv er blevet forstenede plastikdyr.

 Detaljebillede af " Collection Aarhus C ", Carolien Adriaanche.

Detaljebillede af "Collection Aarhus C", Carolien Adriaanche.

Overfor Adriaansches tankevækkende værk kan man følge en flok insekters kamp, for at tilpasse sig de kunstige omgivelser, de er blevet placeret i. Værket betår af fire oplyste terrarier med henholdsvis fluer, vandrende pinde, kakerlakker og myrer, og er lavet af kunstnergruppen MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen og Malthe Klagenberg. Terrarierne er indrettet med en blanding af naturlige materialer, som mos hentet fra skovbunden og syntetiske materialer, som plastikgrannåle og afstøbninger af romanescokål i gips. Terrarierne, med deres spotlys, kommer næsten til at virke som scener, hvor insekterne skal performe en eller anden form for naturlighed i de kunstige miljøer. 

 Terrarier, 2017. MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg. " Lending a Hand ", " Imitation ", " Night Shortly ", " Construction ". Photocredit: Kulturmagasinet Fine Spind, fotograf Mariana Gil.

Terrarier, 2017. MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg. "Lending a Hand", "Imitation", "Night Shortly", "Construction". Photocredit: Kulturmagasinet Fine Spind, fotograf Mariana Gil.

I løbet af udstillingen kan man iagttage hvordan de tilsyneladende sejlivede insekter indretter sig og tilpasser sig deres nye hjem. Man kan bl.a følge de organiserede myrer, der er hentet til Aarhus fra en skov ved Tidsvilleleje. I løbet af få dage i terrariet havde de splittet deres omgivelser af plastikgran og -kogler ad og bygget en form for tue op af materialet.

 Detaljebillede af " Construction ". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med myrer, plastikgrannåle, skovbund, plastikprint. Photocredit:&nbsp;Laurits Nymand Svendsen

Detaljebillede af "Construction". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med myrer, plastikgrannåle, skovbund, plastikprint. Photocredit: Laurits Nymand Svendsen

I et af de mere golde terrarier med sandbund og gipsafstøbninger af romanescokål, ser man fire kakerlakker krybe sammen i et hjørne. De er af arten dødningehovedkakerlakker og har aftegninger af dødningehoveder på deres skjold.  

 Detaljebillede af " Night Shortly " . &nbsp;MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med dødningehovedkakerlakker, afstøbninger af romanescokål, sand, plastikprint.

Detaljebillede af "Night Shortly". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med dødningehovedkakerlakker, afstøbninger af romanescokål, sand, plastikprint.

Det terrarie, der vækker mest begejstring og forundring blandt de besøgende på Godsbanen, er helt klart terrariet med de vandrende pinde. De vandrende pinde er af den særlige art Achrioptera fallax og er hentet i en sommerfuglepark på Bornholm. Som det kan ses på billedet nedenfor er artens hanner meget farverige og udvikler sig til at blive blålige med orangerøde aftegninger på benene og med rødlige små vinger. Det kan være svært at spotte de ellers farverige vandrende pinde, da der også er imitationer af insekterne i plastikler rundt i terrariet. 

 Detaljebillede af " Imitation ". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med vandrende pinde, trægrene, polyestergrene, figurer af vandrende pinde i plastikler og akrylmaling, plastikprint.

Detaljebillede af "Imitation". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med vandrende pinde, trægrene, polyestergrene, figurer af vandrende pinde i plastikler og akrylmaling, plastikprint.

Det sidste af de fire terrarier indeholder fluelarver, der over tid er klækket og er blevet til fluer. Terrariet er dækket med mos og fluernes fødekilde, er en afstøbning af en hånd lavet hovedsageligt af hundefoder. Fluerne er af uvisse årsager gået til i løbet af udstillingen og der er nye fluelarver på vej med posten. 

  "Lending a Hand" . MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med fluer, afstøbning af menneskehånd i husblas, hundefoder og sukker, skovbund, plastikprint.

"Lending a Hand". MOTOR // Laurits Nymand Svendsen, Margrét Agnes Iversen, Malte Klagenberg, 2017. Terrarie med fluer, afstøbning af menneskehånd i husblas, hundefoder og sukker, skovbund, plastikprint.

To ud af de tre kunstnere fra kunstnergruppen MOTOR, Laurits Nymand Svendsen og Malthe Klagenberg, der tilsammen udgør kunstnerduen M.A.N – Man Against Nature, har også tidligere arbejdet undersøgende med symbiosen mellem det organiske og syntestiske. I det tredelte værk "Plateu", "Fordøjelse" og "Passage", der kan findes i Skovsnogens skovområde i Døvling. I værkerne er der på forskellig vis eksperimenteret med at ændre på skovbundens vanlige miljø og værket Passage består af fire døde dyr indkapslet i gennemsigtigt polyester, der lige så stille går i fordærv og optages af skoven igennem sprækker i polyesteren.

"I always have an eye on garbage lying in the street"

Carolien Adriaansche, artist-in-residence
By Inger Stokkink

 Carolien Adriaansche,&nbsp; Collection Aarhus C , 2017. Site-specific installation,&nbsp; Rethinking MATTER: Biotic Synthetic.

Carolien Adriaansche, Collection Aarhus C, 2017. Site-specific installation, Rethinking MATTER: Biotic Synthetic.

Creating biodiversity all by itself from a material that threatens real-life biodiversity - that is what struck curator Pamela Grombacher when she came across Carolien Adriaansche's work. Therefore she and her fellow-curators Sasha Rose Richter and Nana Bendix Hansen decided to invite Adriaansche as their artist-in-residence. Says Grombacher: "Her work dovetails nicely with our Aarhus2017 project Rethinking MATTER, and fits perfectly in the framework of our exhibition Biotic Synthetic." Biotic Synthetic explores the nature/culture dichotomy in the range of exhibitions about rethinking matter - the stuff most visual art is made of.

Plastic is such a matter, and it is the material that Carolien Adriaansche (1963) works with most. "Plastic is inescapable in our society, we use it massively - and we mostly use it just once. Then it becomes waste." Being in essence a nature person, it struck her painfully that waste plastic posed a threat to animal and vegetal life. So she decided to create a parallel biodiversity, making use of the matter that threatens life on our planet.

The result is a rich, manifold, colourful collection of creatures, more often than not exhibited in showcases resembling the ones you'll find in natural history museums. This is a recurrent theme in her work, originating from family holidays, where a visit to the Natural History Museum of Bordeaux made a lasting impression on her: "I was overwhelmed by the shapes and colours and the way the objects were arranged."

PLASTIC OBSESSION
The work she has made for Rethinking MATTER is exemplary for the collection theme. It shows families of sea creatures in all shapes, exhibited in showcases stretching four meters up the walls of Godsbanen's Foyer.

During her artist's talk at Godsbanen on May 4th, Carolien Adriaansche also discussed how her work comes into being. "My atelier in The Hague is stacked with plastics in all shapes and colours. I have a plastic obsession, I always have an eye on garbage lying in the street. And I use a lot of plastic - in fact more than I can gather myself. Over the years I have built up a network of people who collect special objects for me, like the lamps that I used for The Swarm. But there are also people who collect plastic 'in general', so to speak. This means that occasionally I get materials I normally wouldn't have chosen myself. But that challenges my creativity in a good way."

In Aarhus, she needed to gather her working materials quickly. Rethinking MATTER helped by collecting plastics, too, so that Adriaansche had a head start when she arrived. "There is comparatively little waste lying about in Aarhus. That made me explore building sites and skips. So the material I have used for this work is somewhat different from the plastics I usually work with."

Just like you would expect from a sustainable biodiversity: its capacity to adapt to its surroundings.

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Spotlight on Carolien Adriaansche - Residency, Workshop, and Artist Talk

The Rethinking MATTER curatorial team is thrilled to host Carolien Adriaansche for a short-stay residency in preparation for the final exhibition in our series, Biotic Synthetic.

 Carolien Adriaansche,&nbsp; De Zwarm , 2013.

Carolien Adriaansche, De Zwarm, 2013.

Over the course of two weeks, Carolien will create a site-specific installation that explores the relationship between plastic waste and biodiversity. After one week of collecting waste in and around Aarhus, Carolien will lead a 1-day intensive workshop in which she and a group of local artists will work together to build the installation. This workshop will act as frame for critical dialogue on the ecological, economic, and ethical issues surrounding plastic - one of the most pervasive and formative materials on the planet.

Carolien will conclude her stay with a public talk at Aarhus Center for Visual Art's monthly ART BAR (May 4, 5pm).

This project is supported by the Danish Arts Foundation, and is made possible through collaborations with KH7 and Aarhus Center for Visual Art.

 

Got plastic?

We are now collecting plastic waste for Carolien to use in her installation. If you would like to contribute to this project, please drop off your plastic waste at Aarhus Center for Visual Art weekdays between 9.00-16.00.

 

About the Artist

 Carolien Adriaansche

Carolien Adriaansche

Carolien Adriaansche grounds her artistic practice in the large-scale collection of plastic waste, which she uses as the basis for her sculptures and site-specific installations. Inspired by the collections and modes of display in natural history museums, Carolien uses discarded materials such as rubber bands, light bulbs, and plastic containers to create synthetic species - whimsical critters with Latin names such as Lumenbulbus iocus and Musca capillus.

carolienadriaansche.nl